The Devil: Himself

I was part of that generation of young people who arguably got to experience Bill Cosby at the best possible time; Fat Albert and the Cosby Kids was still in reruns when I was in my earliest years, and the first years of The Cosby Show started right when I got to watch prime time television on a regular basis. My parents already owned a couple of Cosby’s comedy albums on vinyl, and I kept picking up more of them on cassette tape when I…

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Hearing Alexis

Writing a screenplay for The Prostitutes of Lake Wiishkoban between the initial short story I came up with, and the novel it eventually became, was kind of a weird step to take, but one that was necessary for me. I’d taken a screenwriting class in undergrad, and while I’d never written a full-length screenplay before, I’d written an act of one, and a screenplay felt like a natural progression from the short story that I wrote, which felt like it was too compressed (probably because…

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Scholared and Kept

As I was finishing up my master’s degree in 2006, I had almost no interest in pursuing a doctorate. I’d enjoyed getting my BA in Creative Writing at the University of Toledo, and I’d definitely had a lot of good classes in graduate school there, but I’d only really stayed on because of the assistantship they’d offered me (I’d been accepted to an MFA programme in California, but they couldn’t offer me any financial assistance), and as soon as I got the opportunity to be…

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Signed Out

It’s been about eleven years since I wrote the short story, that I turned into a screenplay, that I turned into a novel that would eventually be called The Prostitutes of Lake Wiishkoban. As I went through each step of that process, realizing that I had much more to tell of that story than would fit in anything smaller than a full-length book, I began to fear the effort it would take to produce all those words, a task unlike anything I’d ever done as…

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Shadowed

The recent phenomenon of book publishers putting relatively high-prestige titles on deep discount for their digital versions — for anywhere from ninety-cents to four bucks — has been both a blessing and a curse for me. I definitely appreciate being able to pick up books on the cheap, and in addition to boosting my pleasure-reading piles for whenever I have the time to get to those (I was practicing tsundoku long before I heard that word used to describe it), I’ve found some genuinely useful…

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